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Custom MBA Courses to Give You a Better Tomorrow

IMPORTANT: Throughout this article and part 2 of this article, when I use the acronym “MBA”, I am referring to “Full-time MBA” programs from a top-tier business school in Europe and the US. US (see updated rankings here: BusinessWeek or Financial Times). When I mention an MBA here, I’m not referring to any of the following: online MBAs, part-time MBAs, executive MBAs, other master’s degrees, or MBAs from schools that don’t consistently rank within the top ten rankings mentioned.

Career choice after MBA graduation: one of the most important decisions in your professional life

Doing an MBA is a dream come true for many professionals. The reasons for doing so are as diverse as the backgrounds of the people who are ultimately accepted: change of industry, higher salaries, access to major multinational companies, increased opportunities for future promotion, working in a different country, exponential increase in your professional network, etc and… of course… learning about Business Administration in the process. However, one thing is certain for everyone: it is probably the only time in your professional life when, if you really wanted to, you could work for practically any company in the world. In most cases, you don’t even have to actively apply because most companies recruit YOU on campus. Depending on the economic cycle and your background, it is not uncommon to find yourself in a position where you have more than one offer and you have to choose the one you like best. Can you think of any other time in your professional life (in the past or to come) when you actually have two or three amazing job offers at the same time? If you can, you are a very lucky person. Other than that, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity and you have to choose wisely.

There are many things to consider when choosing your career after the MBA, but I won’t go into detail here; this would be material for another article. The only thing that I think is worth mentioning here is that, for me, the most important factor is that you really like what you are doing. It is my personal opinion that if you get into an industry or a mba job that you really like, you will end up being very good at it and will probably make more money in the long run than your peers who chose with a different criteria (high starting salary for example) as its most important factor.

Having said that, if the Internet/Technology/Media industry is what you like to do or what you are passionate about, the rest of this article can give you some decision making tips and help you weigh some pros and cons of getting into it. particular sector where MBAs are not so common. The goal here is to give you reasons for and against taking a job in this industry (by someone who made this decision a couple of years ago) so you can make a better informed decision.

The Internet Industry for an MBA

At first glance, it may seem that there are not many reasons for an MBA graduate to enter the Internet/Media industry. The opportunity cost is too high: you know you’ll make less money (than your consulting/banking peers), your degree has much less value (in an “engineering/tech” driven industry), and it will be much harder to find a job. worked. So… why should an MBA from a top school consider the Internet industry?

First let’s take a look at some of the drawbacks…

“MBA Culture”??… Non-existent

It is no secret that this industry is ruled by technicians, engineers and programmers. This is reasonable given that most of the early innovations in the industry have been driven by people on the “technical” side rather than the “business” side of the industry. Just look at some of the biggest names in the industry of the last 20 years: Sergey Brin and Larry Page (creators of Google), Bill Gates (Microsoft), Pierre Omidyar (eBay), etc., all of them where programmers or mathematicians (perhaps the one exception here might be Jeff Bezos, Amazon). These companies, with Microsoft and Google at the top of the list, have created corporate cultures in which the programmer is king, with all other functions secondary. Many smaller startups have followed the market leaders and developed similar corporate cultures of their own, creating an entire industry where business people (ie, marketing, finance, sales, and other functions) take a backseat. In this environment, MBAs are no exception. There is no tradition of hiring MBAs (the industry is still too young), there are no specially dedicated resources for these types of professionals, there are very few MBAs that are already working in the industry and in general I could sum it up by saying that it has

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